Galaxy

How Shiva and Shakti formed the Milky Way Galaxy

The Gaia space telescope shows How Shiva and Shakti formed the Milky Way Galaxy 12 billion years ago. These two streams of stars wove together to form it.

Euclid’s view of the Horsehead Nebula

Euclid’s first images: the dazzling edge of darkness

Euclid's first images from the dazzling edge of darkness have been revealed. These five images illustrate Euclid's full potential.

The long parallel rays slanting across the top of the featured radio image are known collectively as the Galactic Center Radio Arc and point out from the Galactic plane. The Radio Arc is connected to the Galactic Center by strange curving filaments known as the Arches. The bright radio structure at the bottom right surrounds a black hole at the Galactic Center and is known as Sagittarius A*. One origin hypothesis holds that the Radio Arc and the Arches have their geometry because they contain hot plasma flowing along lines of a constant magnetic field. Images from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory appear to show this plasma colliding with a nearby cloud of cold gas.

This is the radio arc at the centre of our Milky Way Galaxy

This is the Galactic Center Radio Arc, a long, curving structure of parallel rays that points out from the Galactic plane at the top of the featured image. It is connected to the Galactic Center of ou...

This Hubble Space Telescope archival photo captures a curious linear feature that is so unusual it was first dismissed as an imaging artifact from Hubble's cameras. But follow-up spectroscopic observations reveal it is a 200,000-light-year-long chain of young blue stars. A supermassive black hole lies at the tip of the bridge at lower left. The black hole was ejected from the galaxy at upper right. It compressed gas in its wake to leave a long trail of young blue stars. Nothing like this has ever been seen before in the universe. This unusual event happened when the universe was approximately half its current age. Credits: NASA, ESA, Pieter van Dokkum (Yale); Image Processing: Joseph DePasquale (STScI)

Hubble catches a runaway black hole

Hubble catches a runaway black hole that was ejected from its host galaxy after a tussle between it and two other black holes.

3D Model of M87 as observed by Hubble Space Telescope and Keck Observatory in Hawaii. Credit: NASA, ESA, STScI

A potato shaped galaxy seen by telescopes

A potato shaped galaxy seen by telescopes. It is the M87, an elliptical galaxy and one of our neighbours, located 55 million light-years away.

This visualization presents 22 X-ray binary systems that host confirmed black holes at the same scale, with their orbits sped up by about 22,000 times.

Black hole systems in the Milky Way and the Large Magellanic Cloud

22 Black hole systems in the Milky Way and the Large Magellanic Cloud

Two composite images presented side by side, separated by a thin white line. The image on our left features two colliding dwarf galaxies in the late stages of merging into one larger galaxy. The image on our right features two colliding dwarf galaxies in the early stages of merging. In the first pair of dwarf galaxies, on our left, a pale pink shape sits inside a hazy indigo blue cloud. The cloud contains neon pink streaks, and faint white specks. This cloud represents gas and stars in the merging galaxies. The pale pink shape at its core represents a black hole being tracked by the Chandra X-ray Observatory. Directly above the cloud is a neon pink and indigo circle, representing another black hole, followed by a curving tail of hazy indigo circles flecked with white. This tail, which curves up and to our right, is caused by tidal effects from the ongoing collision. Because these two dwarf galaxies are in the final stages of merging, scientists have given the combined galaxy a single name: Mirabilis. In the second pair of dwarf galaxies, on our right, a neon pink cloud with a bright white circle at its core, sits above a larger companion with the same color configuration. These pink clouds are the dwarf galaxies known as Vinteuil and Elstir. The white cores represent black holes tracked by Chandra. Elstir, the larger neon pink cloud, near the bottom, features wispy tendrils. Several of these tendrils appear to reach up toward the smaller galaxy, Vinteuil, creating a bridge of gas and stars.

NASA’s Chandra Discovers Giant Black Holes on Collision Course

A new study using NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory has tracked two pairs of supermassive black holes in dwarf galaxies on collision courses, as discussed in the latest press release. This is the first...

Phantom Galaxy M74 in infrared by James Webb Space Telescope. Source European Space Agency

New images of the spectacular Phantom Galaxy M74

These New images of the spectacular Phantom Galaxy M74 have been captured in infrared by James Webb Space Telescope and in optical by Hubble Space Telescope.

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